Hexagon Mug Rug Tutorial

photo(138)

Okay I’m back today with the tutorial on how to put together the hexagon mug rug like I promised :)

This is a great way to use up the scraps you have laying around in your stash.

What you’ll need:

 hexagon template

scraps of fabric

fabric for the backing

batting (I used some leftover warm and natural)

binding, either store- bought or homemade

rotary cutters or scissors

usual sewing stuff (machine, thread, etc, duh)

First you have to cut out a hexagon piece of fabric from the awesome template you made all by yourself using my hexagon tutorial! I fussy cut a cow because, well why not? Then you’ll need some strips of fabric. I cut them at 1.5 inches wide since I wanted one inch strips when I was done. You can cut them whatever width you want. You don’t really have to worry so much about the length because you can trim them when you’re done. There will be 18 strips of fabric used. You can either cut 18 different fabrics or you can use some more than once. I cut 18 different ones. I was pretty shocked at how many different coordinating scraps I had!

photo(154)

Take your hexagon and one scrap, placing them right sides together, and sew them up using a 1/4″ seam. I should just go ahead and say that everything will have a 1/4″ seam.

photo(153)

Press the seam then open it up and press it again, seam towards the strip piece.

photo(152)

Take a ruler and line it up with the sides of your hexagon. Trim the excess off the strip piece.

photo(150)

Sweet!

photo(149)

Now take the new edge of the hexagon with the strip attached and use that for your new piece. You are building on the hexagon so each piece will be a little larger.

photo(148)

Same as before, press your seam closed and then press it again with the seam in the direction of the new piece. You always want to press in the direction of the new strip, keeping the hexagon flat. Then trim the same as before, lining them up with the sides of the hexagon.

*hint* Try to line up both top and bottom with the clear ruler, since opposite sides should be parallel. It will be easier using a longer side as a guide for straightness.

photo(147)

Go all around, building on each new piece around the hexagon until you do all 6 sides. Then start a new strip, lining it up with the side with the smallest piece, which is now a triangle.

photo(146)

Now continue doing the same thing you have been doing, going all the way around 2 more times.

photo(120)

Always remember to press towards the strip.

photo(121)

Woohoo! The finished top!

Now it is time for the quilting!

Cut out some batting, a little bigger than the top, and also cut some fabric for the backing, a little bigger than the batting. It doesn’t have to be the usual 2″ used in quilts, this is a pretty small project. You could pin or baste it, but I didn’t bother since it was such a small thing and I’m lazy.

photo(145)

Use your ruler and make little marks at the start and stop of each seam line, so you know where to stop and start your quilting.

photo(122)

Now for the fun quilting part :) Start and stop at each little mark, following each seam, trying as hard as you can to “stitch in the ditch” where you can. Start with the center seams and work your way out. This is REALLY difficult impossible to do neatly with a baby in your lap, by the way.

photo(123)

When you are all done, you will have a fun criss-cross pattern going on with your quilting.

photo(144)

You can also see here, that I didn’t follow my tip about matching up the bottom and top parallel sides with the ruler until halfway through, and again was not perfect, ha!

photo(124)

Now take your ruler and, using your rotary cutters, slice off the excess back and batting. Or you can use scissors and carefully cut them.

photo(143)

Now we’re ready to bind!

Starting just before a corner, leaving a few inches of binding free, so you can connect it nicely with the end later, put your binding right sides together with your mug rug. Start stitching, back stitching a couple threads to lock it into place. I stitched where my fold was, which on a 1/2″ finished side measured out to a 3/8″ seam allowance. But really, I just followed the fold more than I followed the marking on my machine. When you get to the corner, stop right at the halfway point between the 2 sides, with your needle down.

photo(125)

Pivot the fabric so you can sew right down to the tip. Then proceed with the sewing down right to the tip.

photo(127)

Now, with needle up, move the mug rug out of the way a little, and position the binding fabric so it goes down the other side neatly. Fold the fabric over the stitch line you made to the corner.

photo(128)

Starting at the top, sew down the new side, repeating the steps with all 6 corners.

photo(129)

When you get to the last corner, only stitch a few stitches so you have enough space to sew the binding’s beginning and end pieces together.

photo(142)

Take the two pieces, and overlap them, drawing a line on the bottom side where the top lays.

photo(131)

Now take that line and draw one exactly 1/2″ away from it (longer, not shorter). Snip off that extra corner of fabric.

photo(141)

To make this easier, You’ll have to clip the sides of the mug rug together so you can easily get the two ends of the binding together. I used a wonder clip, but you can use a pin or a hair clip.

photo(132)

Now take your binding, and right sides together, leaving 1/4″ space at the beginning and end (do you see the little triangle corner there on the left? That will make the pieces fit together properly), sew them up using a 1/4″ seam. I’m sorry this pic is a little wonky, I didn’t leave myself that much room and it was a bit fiddly for me.

photo(133)

Now finger press that seam open and finish up sewing the binding on the mug rug.

photo(140)

Now take the binding and fold it over to the other side.

photo(139)

Take your ends and fold them up into the middle fold of your binding. I clipped at every corner, making sure my corners were folded nicely and that the back of the binding covered the stitch lines from sewing in onto the front.

photo(134)

At this point, you could hand stitch it shut, which would be totally seamless and beautiful, or you can machine stitch it. I used my machine. To do this, I made sure that the bottom of the bindings covered the stitch line, and top stitched the front, stitching in the ditch all around. You want to make sure you just catch the bottom side of the binding. Stitch all around.

photo(135)

Keep checking periodically to make sure you are catching the underside. I’ll tell you a secret… I totally missed some areas, lol. I’ll fix those suckers later.

photo(138)

And we’re done!! Yay!

photo(137)

See how the corners just fold up nicely?

photo(136)

Here is my back, where you can TOTALLY see where I didn’t catch the binding and where my lines got wonky on my quilting. Seriously, don’t quilt something you actually care that much about with a baby in your lap. It really doesn’t work.

Oh well, I still love it!

photo(160)

I also totally love how at night it can double as a wine glass rug ;)

24 thoughts on “Hexagon Mug Rug Tutorial

          1. Thank you for answering. Your answer allows me to be prepared for the free sew. I want sure if I should take the batting with me or not. I will take it just in case I get to that point.

  1. Apparently, I am slow as I am no where near completion. I was able to start the second round of strips. I am okay with the fact that it is not yet completed. It will all be worth it in the end. Although I am thinking that I may have went to big with the intial hexagon. As it stands now it is about 7 inches wide.

  2. I so much loved this that I’m in the hunt/gather mode, getting ready to make another one – with a LOT more different fabrics this time. I’ve got several pieces from that Texas tortilla warmer, and from the other two warmers, so I’m thinkin’ this one (or two) will be a Western theme. Woo hoo!! Can’t wait to start it.

  3. AWESOME tutorial!! Very easy to follow. Did my first top today, haven’t quilted it yet but happy with the piece work. My center is a bit small though – mind telling me what size hexie you started with?? Thanks again for this bit of goodness – can’t wait to finish :-)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *